Monthly Archives: diciembre 2017

“For special occasions, I love pretty dresses – but nothing too frou-frou!”

Twiggy

TRENDS

TREND OF THE MONTH

SEQUIN

Image: Collier Schorr

TRENDS

ACCESSORIES

KENNETH JAY LANE: RHODIUM-PLATED CUBIC ZIRCONIA EARRINGS

“I like to create jewelry that can be worn any time of the year, by any woman,” explains Kenneth Jay Lane. These rhodium-plated earrings are cast in the shape of leaves and set with light-catching cubic zirconia. Wear one for a more understated take or both for maximum impact.

Image: net-a-porter.com

FASHION SHOWS

THEMES

SEQUIN

Themes from Spring/Summer 2018 Collections

  • Paco Rabanne
  • Saint Laurent
  • Emilia Wickstead
  • Christian Dior
Images: vogue.com

SHOPPING

BUY IT

McQ ALEXANDER MCQUEEN

Sequined tulle midi dress

GET IT HERE!
Image: net-a-porter.com

SHOPPING

THE BOOK

MEGHAN MARKLE: VANITY FAIR UK OCTOBER 2017

Image: Peter Lindbergh

MUSE

MEGHAN MARKLE

Rachel Meghan Markle (born August 4, 1981) is an American former actress who is engaged to Prince Harry of the British Royal Family. She has also been a model and campaigned for humanitarian causes. From 2011 she portrayed Rachel Zane on the legal drama series Suits. She has also been known for her role as special agent Amy Jessup in the sci-fi thriller Fringe. She had previously worked as a freelance calligrapher.
Markle was born and raised in Los Angeles, California. She graduated from Northwestern University with a degree in theater and international studies in 2003. Her engagement to Prince Harry was announced on November 27, 2017, when it was said that she would retire from acting and devote her time to humanitarian causes.

Image: elleuk.com

BEAUTY

FRAGRANCE

VALENTINO: DONNA NOIR ABSOLU

The latest fragrances from the Italian fashion house of Valentino, Valentino Uomo from 2014, with smoky, woody, sweet accents and leather, and Valentino Donna from 2015, a warm floral oriental with the noble ingredients of iris, rose, vanilla and leather, received new versions in October 2017. Valentino Uomo Noir Absolu and Valentino Donna Noir Absolu were presented exclusively through Harrods while promising less sweet and more intense compositions.
Valentino Donna Noir Absolu is made by Sonia Constant. It is centered on a lascivious rose, enriched with black pepper in the top notes, and an opulent accord of plum liquor. The base includes leather and sandalwood.

Image: fragrantica.com

NEWS

HEAVENLY BODIES: FASHION AND THE CATHOLIC IMAGINATION

Next spring, the Costume Institute will sanctify its love of fashion as it presents “Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination.” Designed to create a dialogue between fashion and the masterworks of religious art in the museum’s holdings, the show will be presented in a trinity of locations: the Anna Wintour Costume Center, the medieval galleries at the Met’s Fifth Avenue location, and further uptown at the Cloisters. Central to the conversation will be the papal garb on loan from the Sistine Chapel sacristy, many of which have never been seen outside the Vatican, even in the 1983 Met blockbuster, “The Vatican Collections: The Papacy and Art.”
The display of these extraordinary ecclesiastical pieces will highlight the enduring influence of religion and liturgical vestments on fashion, from Cristóbal Balenciaga to Donatella Versace, who is a sponsor, alongside Christine and Stephen A. Schwarzman, of the show. (Condé Nast will provide additional support.) Among the 150 or so ensembles that will be on display are pieces by Coco Chanel, who was educated by nuns, and John Galliano, whose transgressive Fall 2000 Couture collection for Christian Dior opened with a mitred, incense-swinging pope-like figure who proceeded down the runway to a voice intoning: “Understand the concept of love.”
By placing fashion within “the broader context of religious artistic production” (like paintings and architecture), Costume Institute curator in charge Andrew Bolton, working alongside colleagues from the Met’s medieval department and the Cloisters, aims to show how “material Christianity” has helped form “the Catholic imagination.” The intersection of faith and fashion, the sacred and profane, as it were, has not always been easy—“complex and sometimes contested” is how Bolton characterizes the relationship—but the interplay between the two has inspired some awe-inspiring sartorial innovation.
“Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination” is on view May 10–October 8, 2018. A catalog with photographs by Katerina Jebb will accompany the exhibition.

Image: vogue.com