Monthly Archives: junio 2018

“When I don’t know what to wear, I wear black lace”.

Carine Roitfeld

TRENDS

TREND OF THE MONTH

LACE

Image: Stefania Paparel

TRENDS

ACCESSORIES

SOPHIA WEBSTER: COCO CRYSTAL-EMBELLISHED VELVET ANKLE BOOTS

Dress from the feet up with Sophia Webster’s ‘Coco’ boots. Made from plush black velvet, this point-toe pair is set on a sculptural crystal-embellished heel. You’ll love the way they sparkle with every step.

Image: net-a-porter.com

FASHION SHOWS

THEMES

LACE

Themes from Spring/Summer 2019 Resort Collections

  • Christian Dior
  • Gucci
  • Christian Dior
  • Chloe
Images: vogue.com

SHOPPING

BUY IT

SELF-PORTRAIT

Guipure lace and crepe maxi dress

GET IT HERE!
Image: net-a-porter.com

SHOPPING

THE BOOK

LILY ALDRIDGE: PORTER EDIT MAGAZINE MARCH 2018

Image: Alexander Saladrigas

MUSE

LILY ALDRIDGE

Lily Maud Aldridge (born November 15, 1985) is an American model. She is a Victoria’s Secret Angel and a Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue model, appearing as a rookie alongside Chrissy Teigen and Nina Agdal in 2014 for the cover of the issue’s 50th anniversary.

Image: Hugh Lippe

BEAUTY

FRAGRANCE

CACHAREL: YES I AM EAU DE PARFUM

The house of Cacharel launches its brand new fragrance for woman called Yes I Am, announced as a strong aspirational portrait of femininity. Yes I am comes in a black smoky finished quilted glass bottle designed to recall a lipstick, as “the most iconic object of a woman”.
The juice promises to be sensual and modern oriental-spicy one. The fruity top notes include citrus zest and sweet raspberry. The heart develops with white floral accords and amber on a spicy and creamy agreement of notes that forms the base.

Image: fragrantica.com

NEWS

LIFE IN MOTION: EGON SCHIELE/ FRANCESCA WOODMAN

10 years on from our acclaimed exhibition of Gustav Klimt, Tate Liverpool showcases the works of his radical protégé, Egon Schiele, alongside the sublime photography of Francesca Woodman.
Both artists are known for their intimate and unapologetic portraits, which look beneath the surface to capture their subjects’ emotions. Schiele’s (1890–1918) drawings are strikingly raw and direct. He had a distinctive style using quick marks and sharp lines to portray the energy of his models. Woodman used long exposures to create blurred images that captured extended moments in time. Her photographs can be surreal, humorous and at times painfully honest.
The close encounter between these two exceptional artists offers an intense viewing experience and a new perspective on their personal and powerful works.
This project is co-financed by the European Regional Development Fund through the Interreg Atlantic Area Programme with additional support from Tate Liverpool Members.
On now – 23 September 2018

Image: tate.org.uk